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important two-fold purpose. it promotes normal trade relations with russia, and at the same time the legislation insists that the russian government adhere to the rule of law. it does so by putting consequences in place for those in russia who abusive human rights, basic human rights. granting pntr to russia is a big win for americans. if congress does not act, american workers, including millions employed by small businesses, stand to lose out to foreign competitors as russia opens its market as a new member of the world trade organization. many in my home state of mississippi and around the country deserve to benefit from increased trade that this new relationship would bring. more jobs and greater economic growth are our potential rewards here in the united states. last year, mississippi's $55 million in exports to russia helped support an estimated 170 jobs. certainly, this number needs to grow, and i believe it will under this legislation. yet in realizing the immense trade potential at hand, we cannot ignore the urgent need to address serious concerns about russia's appalli
, russia, has one military outpost anywhere in the world that is not the former soviet union. they've only got one. guess where it is. that's next. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. challenge that with new olay facial hair removal duo. a two-step process that removes even coarse, stubborn facial hair gently. plenty of gain, without all that pain... with olay. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophistic
that this is true, has outposts covering the globe. in contrast, our old cold war adversary, russia, has one military outpost anywhere in the world that is not the former soviet union. they've only got one. guess where it is. that's next. [ heart beating, monitor beeping ] woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] al
outposts covering the globe. in contrast, our old cold war adversary, russia, has one military outpost anywhere in the world that is not the former soviet union. they've only got one. guess where it is. that's next. >>> okay. it's october 1973. president richard nixon is up to his neck in the watergate scandal. the scandal that will soon topple his presidency. his vice president is just days away from resigning. the walls are closing in around him. and out of nowhere a crisis breaks out half a world away. >> good evening. it is an all-out war. that's how israeli defense minister moshe dian describes an invasion of the golan heights and the east banks of the suez by syria and egypt. the surprise attacks came early this morning in the air and on the ground. >> surprise attacks. in october 1973, as richard nixon is crumbling beneath the weight of watergate, our ally israel is simultaneously surprise attacked by egypt from the west and by syria from the north. after initially being caught off guard by the attacks, israel eventually takes the upper hand. they are not only able to defend the
for peace talks as the violence escalates. the country's ally, russia, is inviting the leader of syria's opposition to visit moskow for the first time but that offer turned down. some interesting developments here. let's get them from leland vittert live in our mideast bureau. leland? >> reporter: jon, no one really views russia as an honest broker here especially the rebels who for so long seen russia side with pat assad in this conflict. they don't really want to deal with the russians, hence turning down the invitation. the rebels now think time is on their side. the momentum is on the battlefield has shifted. for so long the rebels were outgunned and outmaneuvered. they hold major parts of northern part of the syria and major population centers in the center of the country that president assad up till now had control. one rebel fighter said we'll fight all the way to president assad's palace. the rebels don't see a reason to negotiate while president assad is in power. the while the offer from the russians may not be so significant is the fact they're making it is significant. russ
nations special envoy to syria this weekend. russia has repeatedly blocked the united nations from taking action against the syrian government but has recently taken steps to distance itself from the syrian regime. egypt's president mohammed morsi portion of voters opposed the enough constitution. he is calling for dialogue now to address the divisions that has polarized the nation and led to mass protests. still he had nothing concrete to offer his opponents. new document passed in a referendum with nearly 64% of the vote. critics say it restricts freedom and expands the influence of islamic law. president morsi and supporters says moderate democratic state in fighting depression, dictatorship, nepotism and corruption. the holiday shopping season is drawing to a close so bring on the after christmas deals and you can bet retailers will do whatever they can to get you back in their stores. because overall, holiday sales numbers are way way down. context and perspective from the fox business network ahead. plus, the healthcare overhaul. the super size drink ban, remember that. and the west
for a cough. >> a deadly plane crash in russia tonight. what investigators believe happened. >> following developing news from russia, where a passenger plane has crashed as it as it attempted to land in moscow. 4 people of the eight who were on board were killed, 4 others seriously injured. and the the woman who was gang raped in india at two weeks ago has died. the police in new delhi are urging people to stay calm. there have already been riots and the city. the crowds have demanding punishment for six people arrested in the attack. the woman and a male companion were insulted on a bus. the woman had severe organ failure from the injuries to her body and brain. >> an arrest and charges against a woman who pushed a subway passenger to his death in queens. she is charged with murder as a hate crime. investigators say the man was pushed in front of the subway train thursday night. the police released this sketch thursday night and said the tip led to our rest -- her arrest. >> a connecticut lawyer wants to sue the state for $100 million on behalf of the six-rolled survivor. -- a 6-year-o
in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. below freezing in new york city at 31. just to let you know, it's not over yet. a brand new storm system set up these winter weather advisories for pennsylvania and into new york, washington, d.c., and the mountains of virginia. you can see also ohio slammed again after so much snow from the first system. so the way it's going to play out, saturday into sunday, this system is likely going to bring heavier snow to area
are using everything from instagram to angry birds to track you online. >>> and russia's parliament moves to make it illegal for americans to adopt russian children. one family whose adoption plans are on hold and the revenge factor behind the controversial ban on "cbs this morning." >>> this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by the u.s. postal service. schedule your free package pickup today. announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you nee
rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to happen to them. it's very sad because the parents and children have had numerous visits to russia by the parents. the russians have put them through the loops to see the u.s. governm says it will fight to see that these cases come together. but the law is not clear at this point what is going to happen. heather:
in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead o
children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set everything up and can't go pick up the kids. horrible. anyway, a maryland pizza delivery man fights off a group of attackers. his reward? a demotion. >> he sucker punched me. my glasses flew off. i dropped the
push to end the bloody war in syria. russia's foreign minister and the u.n. envoy, for syria are meeting today and both are calling for a a long-sd piece initiative that calls for a transitional government leading to elections. this meeting coming as new violence erupts between government and rebel forces. that violence has left dozens dead. in fact so far the death toll, it was at 40,000 and it now supposedly topped 45,000. but we are having a meeting this weekend between that u.n. envoy for syria and russia's foreign minister. they will be discussing this plan for a transitional government and we're going to talk more about that right now with fox news military analyst general jack keane, a four-star general and former vice chief of staff of the army. thank you for joining us, general. >> good to be here, patti ann. patti ann: back in june the world powers in geneva came up with this proposal for a unity government. both the assad regime and the opposition rejected it because it would involve the two sides sharing power. now they want to revive the plan but is it desirable?
. 7:30 a.m. sunday, right? eastern time. sanjay gupta, don't miss him. >>> russia's government trying to put the brakes on american parents adopting russian children. coming up next, the impact families here in the u.s. and really what is being done to stop this proposed ban. [ female announcer ] what if the next big thing, isn't a thing at all? it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> helping newtown heal. one week after the tragic school shooting at that elementary school, some people coping with unimaginable sorrow are turning to dogs. take a look. >> he's a comfort dog. you can pet him. it says right here, please pet me. a comfort dog is whatever brings comfort to other people, when they're suffering or hurting or brings happiness to people, helps people process their grief. >> it's okay, abbie. it's good girl. ye
here? >> reporter: yes, gregg. russia is furious about a u.s. law which puts visa bans and asset freezes on 60 russians that congress believes were involved in some way or complicit in the deaths of a russian lawyer in jail in 2009. now he was investigating a massive fraud case at the request of a u.s. company in russia that believed millions of dollars it paid to the russian government in tax money were diverted, stolen by russians with connections to the government. he was 30 self -- 37 years old when he died and the allegations are that at best he was denied medical treatment while in jail. at worse he was tortured. russia has been very defiant in this case and trying him posthumously for fraud. the russian government passed this ban, what appears to be retaliatory law prohibiting americans from adopting russian orphans, naming the law after a 2-year-old boy who died while in the custody of u.s. adopted parents a few years ago. gregg? gregg: amy, are there repercussions here? >> reporter: there certainly are. even though this law was passed pretty much unanimously in russia's
as the sweetest 4-year-old boy you could ever meet. he lives in russia where the moyers visited him a few months ago with the intention of adopting him. >> we know that there are special needs children in that area of the world and that is something that we are open to and the child that we are pursing, vatalia, has down's syndrome. >> reporter: the moyers who live in georgia are facing what could be an insurmountable obstacle. president vladimir putin has indicated he will sign it into law. >> if what they say is going to happen really happens, those families are not going to be able to adopt the kids even if all the legal processes already have been in place. but much more important, let's focus on the children. what it means is those children will remain institutionalized. >> reporter: some see the russian bill as retaliation for an american law that puts restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations. according to statics by the u.s. state department, the number of russian children adopted by american couples has increased significantly in the last few years. in 2004, the number
tie onin -- tycoon in 1998. and at this moment he was the richest man in russia, but russia had just experienced its default and devaluations. so he was in kind of a bad mood. and this is what he said to me about oligarchs and everybody else. if a man is not an oligarch, something is not right with him. everyone had the same starting conditions, everyone could have done it. and he really meant it, you know? it was very, very heartfelt. and he was particularly -- he was kind of criticizing himself in this because he had lost a couple of hundred million dollars because he had stupidly entrusted a nonoligarch, there therefore, not a true man, with running his bank, and this nonoligarch -- by definition, not a smart guy -- had the loss of a few hundred million bucks. but that is, you know, there's a little bit of that thinking in a lot of these guys, and it's interesting because i came across, i think there are very strong parallels, i won't have time to talk about all of them. but in my book i talk about the parallels of industrial revolution. and there's a line from andrew carnegie whi
for russia's weapons that were made for were times that anybody can get. >> i think all that is true. i do think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in the 1990's, and that it works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's
extraordinary videotape. >> out of russia. a plane crash outside of moscow. we'll begin with this stunning video. the plane overshot the runway and careened into traffic and abc has the story. >> reporter: you're about to see the terrifying moment of impact as the russian passenger jet slams into a busy highway. watch again. you can see the plane's tire colliding with the moving car. and listen closely. you can hear the squealing brakes and crushing metal. the crash took place on saturday at an airport outside moscow. the red wing's airline's flight broke through a barrier fence shattering into three pieces and bursting into flames before skidding to a stop at the edge of the highway. witnesses rushed to pull survivors out of the wreckage. the russian made tupolev 204 was flying back from the czech republic with no passengers and eight crew members on board. officials say four of them were killed including the pilots. the other four were seriously injured. an investigation has been opened but officials have already suggested that pilot error was to blame. miraculously, everyone on the highway su
. this marks 20 years since russia and the u.s. agreed to secure weapons in the former soviet state. leon panetta introduces the president at this event. >> thank you. [applause] midafternoon. senators, distinguished guests, ambassadors and officials, thank you all for being here today. i am honored to be able to participate in this symposium marking the 20th anniversary. let me thank the university for their great work in organizing today's conference. it has been a day to reflect on the successes that have been achieved in non-proliferation over the past two decades through the program, and it has been a particular honor to be when the company of senators whose leadership has made this possible. we can stay the course of history change for the better because these men helped the nation confronts the threat of nuclear proliferation at the end of the cold war. the world would have been a far more dangerous and threatening place were it not for these patriots. earlier this afternoon i was honored to be able to present the distinguished public service award, the highest civilian honor. he h
. >> and is russia vladimir putin playing with children's lives . what he just did. >>> and the newspapers that published the names of licensed gun owners. fox and friends starts right now. ♪ >> julia: hello, everybody. >> three days left. three days left before we go head first over the fiscal cliff. >> julia: before we talk about the fiscal cliff. you did cavuto. you did o'rielly or i mean not o'rielly. the five. today you have this show and then cavuto and then on the five. >> you will be on the five. >> julia: and then other things. >> it is one of those days. iclele ladies and gentlemen, eric bowling -- boling is the mara thon man. >> it is good to be here. >> julia: yes, it is good to be here. >> kelly: thank you for joining us this morning. >> julia: the headlines and fox news alert it appears russian president vladimir putin is trying to make a political point at the expense of orphans. he signed a bill that bans americans from adopting russia children. i can't believe this happening in retaliation law for cracking down on russia human rights vialators. >> these children are not
or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to stalin. and i approached it and i told bill phillips this -- host: your editor? guest: yes, my editor bill tphreupls. as if i was making a quilt. and i think this got a little off in the "new york times" artic article, that i would focus on that story that week, the invasion of russia. well, there was always something else happening that week, too. now we've two or three stories that have to be intertwined and i can't go down too far in the road to august of 1941 with the russian front and ca come all the way back to june 20 then go down to august with the african front. it wouldn't work. so, a read a lot. i bought harriman's memoirs. bill man westchester, in his notes, would xerox a page and cut out a little paragraph and 50 pages later you may find another paragraph from harriman's family worries but there was no contex
, and it -- russia. 70% of the world's energy is here. and energy becomes so dramatically contagious, what do you do, briefly on human rights, i do believe actually the big difference between the democracy and dictatorship is simply this, a soft asset but very important one that india doesn't record human-rights that we will necessarily be proud of but -- i believe that china may be a successful nation that cannot be a modern nation and the only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the quality and presents and until then if it is successful -- >> let me say three things. i want to follow on the admiral's comments about democracy, it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the united states has not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple votes short. i think senator mikulski for her encouragement. i hope we will be able to take that up again and get it done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we are making which is these potential conflicts over territory from reed bank and
? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i move to proceed to h.r. 6516, which is the russia moll did a have a trade agreement. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 552, h.r. 6156, an act to authorize the extension of nondiscriminatory treatment, normal trade relations treatment, to products of the russian federation and moldova and to require reports on the compliance of the russian federation with its obligations as a member of the world trade organization and for other purposes. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from -- mr. mccain: i thank the -- the presiding officer: the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: i would like to thank the majority leader for his patience in allowing this legislation to be completed. i would note that there was 145 amendments, and many recorded votes and good debate and discussion over very important issues, and i thank the majority leader for allowing this process to go forward. i also would like to say "thank you" to the majority leader. i would not -- i wo
missiles could mean for the larger conflict. alisyn: that is good context. what is russia saying now about the assad regime? >> reporter: yesterday they came out and said, all right, we think there is a possibility president assad would fall. this is one of those things speaking to truth as this russian diplomat did may not exactly jive with the party line. inside baseball here as russia came out today and forcefully gotten behind president assad said, no, no, our diplomat was misquoted. he was saying what the opposition was saying. a little fanciful. there was hope as the humanitarian crisis increases inside syria there are many more hundreds if not thousands of people dying inside syria that russia may be loosening ties to president assad. sadly for the united states and allies we found out that russia is continuing to hold fast with president assad their long time ally and happy to see him kill as many of his own citizens as he would like. alisyn: thanks leland. bill: you think about the last two years of headlines and think about this region how much it dominated the coverage we've had
-- russia. >> and a emergency spending package for hurricane sandy sail would through the senate. it faces optician in the house. they face a smaller version . gop leaders appear to be reluctant to movog big spending bills . looks like eye snow i saturday for much. east. they are digging out from a storm that brought a foot to many. we are there with the nor cast. they are expecting more out of the northeast with a new storm system. and this is it 20 inches of snow ins of new york it is it another round it the good news it is forecast to be weaker than the last storm system. we are not expecting to see much snow . the reason why. the actul storm is not as strong . so again. not as much snow this time around . in massachusetts and parts of rhode island, we'll look at significant snow accumulations . we are dealing with a lot of heavy rain . that has since moved off shore. we are see snow shower necessary new york city and snow in portions of upstate new york and across the state of pennsylvania. how much snow are we talking about in the i-95 one-two inches in philadelphia. rain will be mixi
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
. >> but the state department is encouraging russia to withdraw their support and join with the u.s. in implementing a political transition. that has not happened yet. but this was very significant they came out and said this. >> we've seen how brutal assad has been. two years in the civil war. still a volatile situation. >>> look how they settle their differences in ukraine's capital. a full-blown brawl brokeute in parliament in kiev. grown men pushing, shoving and punching over the election over a new speaker. is that a mosh pit going on, too? the head of the opposition happens to be the world heavyweight boxing champ. fortunately, he decided to sit this one out. wow. they were rolling their sleeves up and going at it. ding, next round. >> looks like one of our staff meetings. >> we only have five people. >>> today's play of the day is also a new contender for most embarrassing nfl play of the season. this is great. >> courtesy of the eagles. look at this, punts the ball right into his own blocker. been that kind of year for the eagles. they got blown out, 34-13. their record is a dreadful 4-10. t
. >>> this is what happens when you park illegally in russia. we just found this video. a great big truck with a great big claw picking up a car. it seems sensible. seems like a reasonable ex expenditure expenditure. >> where does it go? >> immediately in the back of the truck. >> to immediately strip it down. >> hopefully to recycling. welcome back to "cbs this morning," everyone. >>> a suburban newspaper is in the middle of controversy after it put up everyone's name and address who has a gun permit. >> it quickly spread around the internet. as jim axelrod reports, critics say it's too much information. >> reporter: driving through this typical westchester neighborhood, you can tell a lot, who's got a new car, who just finished their addition who's got the best christmas ornament ornaments. now thanks to this website you also might fwhoe has a handgun. it began as an 1,800-world article in this past sunday's edition of "the journal news" that covers three counties. included in the article included a map with names and addresses of those likely to own a handgun in
the treaty including china and russia. the treaty is modelled after existing u.s. law. former senator bob dole is 89 years old. he just got out of the hospital yesterday. and today he came to the senate floor in a wheelchair to support the treaty. eight republicans and two independents voted for the treaty including john mccain. but it wasn't enough. the treaty failed 61-38. >> it was solid then. he means it. and i think the organizing around it is so important. the labor movement, consumer groups, women's groups. >> i'm joined by a columnist for the nation magazine and howard fineman, msnbc political analyst. great to have you with us. howard, you first. when bob dole comes to the senate and he can't move people, where is the common sense? >> the senate is lost. that's the way i would put it. bob dole, one of the most revered figures. he's almost literally on his death bed a week or two ago. who summoned the courage to come to the senate to be the conscious on something he championed in 1990. this was senator bob dole, a republican. president george h. bush, republican. dick thorneberg,
ally russia is conceding. president bashar assad is losing control of his country. bomb blast near a school in damascus killed at least 16 people today. it was a domestic suburb. the state news agency says half of them were women and children. government blames terrorists. it's named for rebels. one american killed and three wounded when a suicide bomber on a motorcycle attacked the main military base in southern afghanistan. it came after nightfall at a gate that provides access to military side of the kandahar airfield. back at home, there are serious questions about whether the national labor relations board has lost its way or perhaps embarked on a new course. correspondent doug mckelway on a group that is supposed to be all about fairness. >> the national labor relations board, the federal agency tapped with protecting employees from unfair management or the union practices has become a biased advocate for big labor. that blunt assess in the a report released today by chairmachairman isa. >> they are supposed to be a neutral arbitrator and have a firewall between the judges an
into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or tw
balance between the united states and russia under new start force levels would be stable except, of course, for the huge diversity or disparity, i would say in tactical nuclear weapons that russia enjoys. but under the stability there would be no incentives to strike first during a crisis nor would there be incentives to grow our respective nuclear arsenals in the future. we should, therefore, think very carefully before we contemplate any changes to long-standing u.s. nuclear deterrence policies or pursue further reductions in support of the president's disarmament agenda. we absolutely cannot know for certain that fewer numbers of weapons will make us safer. in fact, henry kissinger and brent scowcroft recently reminded us -- quote -- "that strategic stability is not inherent with low numbers of weapons. indeed, excessively low numbers could lead to a situation in which surprise attacks are conceivable." policy-makers would do well to heed the advice of winston churchill, offered in his last address to the united states congress. "be careful," he said. "above all things not to
that russia's behavior is really quite naughty. don't forget viewers in the united states can catch our latest gps special tonight called "tough decisions" and it examines how major decisions are made in everything from national security to business to family affairs. it airs tonight at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. don't miss it. >>> thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week, i will see you next week. stay tuned for "reliable sources." >>> there are signs maybe just a glimmer, maybe something more, that the tone of journalism is starting to change in the wake of the connecticut school massacre. signs of this is not just another tragedy that we talk about for a week and move on, but has changed the sensibility of the news business. that has some commentators rethinking their long-standing opposition to gun control. >> i knew that day that the ideologies of my past career were no longer relevant to the future that i want. that i demand for my children. friday changed everything. it must change everything. it is time for congress to put children before deadly da
in southern russia of some significance in 1774. so there must of had a lot of troops left over. they were approached obviously early in 1775. by june 1775, there is a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown was tried to hire russians. and they thought that -- that they had arranged, but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775, partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. and they were not fond of the notion of letting troops to go through german territory. at any event, it did not happen. after that, they had to turn to there werens -- the haiti about 50,000 german mercenaries, not all of the same time. >> i am jumping here, but, in the end, why do the patriots win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british from the start, the logistics' were enormously difficult, the number of the ships they needed, the number of troops. they did not have them. but even more than that, you had 13 colonies, large population, a number of them -- they had a lot of people who fought in previous wars. the british were not able to
occasionally to rent out. they had a war in southern russia of some significance in 1774, so they must of had a lot of troops left over that they had organized for that. they were approached early in 1775. by june of 1775 there's a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown is trying to hire russians. they thought they had it arranged, but it's all part then -- but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775 partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. there were not friendly to the notion of letting troops go through german territory. in any event, it did not happen. after that, they had returned to the hessians. they came from a number of german states. probably a total of 50,000 german mercenaries during the revolution all and all. >> in the end, why did the colonists or why did the patriots went? -- win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british. from the british the logistics were enormously difficult. the number of ships they needed, the number of troops, but did not have them. even more than that, you had 13 colo
for sanctions against russians deemed guilty of human rights violations. russia has been the single biggest sort of adopted children by u.s. families. >>> emergency contraceptives will remain part of the federal health care law. -- and similar contraceptive bills from acquired health care plans. two companies sued the government. >>> if you've been to an aquarium, a question may have crossed your mind, what if the glass shattered? it happened last, it burt right there. that poor person, showering crowds will live sharks and sharding of glass. 16 people were hurt and three lemon sharks, dozens of turtles and lots of fish were killed. >>> the 13 to watch in 2013. politico has a new list out. we'll talk about a rising star and hollywood celebrity that made that list. that's coming up in about five. >>> the death toll from a powerful storm has now climbed to 12 at the airports nearly 3,000 flights have been canceled tuesday tuesday. weather channel meteorologist mike seidel is live near buffalo. it looks like the snow has subsided a wee bit? >> reporter: it has in upstate new york, richard. roads in
. throwing boiling water froze it snaptly. >> steve: he made it snow. from russia with love. tell us about rg3. >> brian: you want to know. i am fascinated by that. that is thomas edison in russia. rg3 is ready to go. the rookie quarterback will play against the eagles. i say give him time and he has such a bright future . he missed last week's name with a sprained knee. eventually the giants will win. he is a football icon in chicago. >> you hear what i said. >> steve: embarrassed? >> brian: mike ditka didn't get his own message. admitting he is a fan of greenbay packers. ditka coached the bears for seasons. he's changed loyalties . who will win the bcs championship. a dolphin in the miami sea aquarium picking the fighting irash over alabama. he hadie choice and he went dolphin. he is 2-wrero with the picks. that is the scientific waya of doing things. for an unrelated top we'll go to steve. >> steve: ugly on the runway. call them gaud yeobscene, but don't call them pretty. today on "fox and friends", we'll bring you the ugly christmas sweaters on the market. this is the creator of the fashi
, everyone, russia's vladimir putin, now banning the adoption of russian children by americans as of january 1, even halting the adoptions already in progress dealing an emotional blow to many families including our next guest. robert and kim summers are parents in the process of adopting a russian child and they're afraid they'll never see him again. robert and kim, good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> dave: i'm sorry what you're going through and what the russian president is doing is despicable to say the least. you were so close, felt it was a part of your family, tell me how difficult it's been. >> you can't fathom the pain, it feels like losing your child. this is our son and we have spent so many-- so much time waiting to get to this happy point and as a matter of fact, i looked at my husband this morning and said two weeks to go and we'll be in russia holding our son. and now that's so-- we don't know where we're at. >> dave: robert. in terms of the process and in terms of the emotional commitment, tell me how far along you are in this process. >> emotionally we're draine
to syria come as that country's ally, russia, signals that the use of chemical weapons is a red line for their own support for syria. joining me now is nbc's chief pentagon correspondent jim jim miklaszewski. a speech that really didn't have anything having to do with what syria, clearly there's intelligence on the ground that has u.s. officials concerned. >> reporter: that's right, chuck. all the latest intelligence indicates that the u.s., nato, and particularly the syrian people are really staring the worst case scenario directly in the face. just about the time rebel forces started to make significant advances in the capital da m damascus, u.s. officials tell nbc news that the assad regime informed its chemical weapons corps to get prepared. and just about that time, u.s. intelligence noticed a flurry of activity around several of the chemical weapons sites, an indication, perhaps, that the chemical corps is moving two precan cursor chemicals to the same locations to weaponize artillery shells and once you combine those precursor chemicals it creates that deadly nerve gas. now th
with the opposition. on the syrian diplomatic front, secretary of state hillary clinton said today russia and the u.s. will support new efforts to mediate peace. but clinton underscored that the u.s. still insists that president bashar assad leave power. she spoke today in northern ireland, a day after meeting with russian foreign minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for t
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